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June 15, 2009

Comments

Marita

Interesting articles there, thank you for linking them here.

I've been doing a lot of reading and going to seminars on socialising children on the autism spectrum. A big part of what I'm learning is about modeling the correct response.

Modeling what to do when I disagree with someone or modeling anger or sadness.

It is fascinating to me how many subtle cues the neurotypical (NT) brain picks up and absorbs where as children on the spectrum have to be trained step by step through a process that NT infants just automatically know. I didn't realise how much is involved in somethings until I was learning how to break them down into simple steps to teach my daughter.

hedra

While not as urgent, I have a similar task with work, breaking down reactions from a different culture and explaining them 'across' - what is actually going on when this person does X, reacts Y, says Z? How do we parse that, what cues did I read, and how did I determine the context? Of the three possible options that it could have meant, why did I think it was this one? How do we respond to that? What will be effective, and what are the possible risks and benefits of each response?

Something as simple as inviting a client to a project celebration ends up being 'okay, given response X, these are what the likely responses were. Given those response meanings, our options are now down to three possible secondary responses - make another attempt to invite now, invite closer to the event, or ignore. The merits of a) are... '

Not as life-stream essential, but important. And complicated, at times. And I'm dealing with adults with fully developed cognition, too.

Cathy

Those are interesting. I wonder if the first study extrapolates out to birth order traits. The younger sibs see what's happening with the older ones and learns the priorities of the parents and what kid of stuff they let slide, etc.

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